Blogger blogs referencing PFFA

Just thought I’d try a search through Blogger for such places. Here’re some of the references that turned up:

Yclepta
Blue Sky Tavern (1)
Blue Sky Tavern (2)
Rest In Peace (1)
Rest In Peace (2)
Blue Tattoo
William A. Baurle
Joseph Banvard Comments

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11 thoughts on “Blogger blogs referencing PFFA

  1. Some interesting links there! Most were very positive about PFFA.

    One of them talked about a “PFFA idiot” who said her poem had too many adjectives and not enough form – “whatever that meant”.

    Good to see Urizen’s blog, which I didn’t know about until today.

  2. Your idiot status is as of yet unproven; however your association with the egotistical and arrogant bastions of poetry at PFFA naturally lured my thought process in that direction.

    I thank you for the kind commment, and hope you visit again.

  3. Sorry. I made a mistake in my last post and deleted it.

    Scavella – hope it’s OK to continue this discussion here. I suppose you have the power to delete posts if you want to finish it all.

    Blue Tattoo – for the record, I’ve enjoyed quite a bit of what I’ve read in your blog too (although I wasn’t so keen on the Orson Welles “interview”), and your latest post – the long poem set in the ER – has some very good sections and a fine ending.

    At PFFA I have read critiques, both of my own poems and of others, that I have considered idiotic, arrogant, or , and sometimes all three together. However, I’ve also read far more critiques that have been astute, humble, and very helpful.

    It’s usually a matter of tone. If a critic says, “I thought the form was wrong and there were too many modifiers,” you can either agree or disagree with respect to the poem in question. If a critic says, “You don’t know a damn thing about how to form a poem, do you? Your poem is a mess and your love-affair with modifiers is enough to make me sick in my lunch,” well, then you may feel the critic must be some kind of idiot.

    Mind you, who isn’t an idiot now and again? I’m sure I’ve made comments on poems that have been thought idiotic by the writer and by everyone else.

  4. I can’t believe it. I’ve made a mistake again. My fourth paragraph should have read:

    “At PFFA I have read critiques, both of my own poems and of others, that I have considered idiotic, arrogant or egotistical, and sometimes all three together. However, I’ve also read far more critiques that have been astute, humble, and very helpful.”

  5. Rob, it’s fine to continue the discussion. I probably won’t get into it, because I’m a mod overthere, but part of the purpose of having this blog is for this kind of exchange to take place on some kind of semi-neutral ground.

    I say semi-neutral because if any discussion deteriorates into unproductive insult-slinging, I’ll end it.

    After all, it’s my blog.

  6. Mr. Mackenzie, you are quite correct. I am willing to accept any critique offered in an honest, polite manner. Unfortunately, my brief experience at PFFA was of the type rendered in such a tone as to be, well, condescending and patronizing describes it best.
    I may not be a well-known poet or even an apt one; but nor I am ignorent of of the mechanics.

    I suppose, in the end, it’s all a matter of opinion. The trick is to be able to pass on that opinion in terms one is willing to listen to.

    I apologize for any offense; I admit to being somewhat of a hot head.
    Thanks again to you both for your visits to Blue; please feel free to return anytime.

    Mr. Scavella, with your permission, I should like to provide a link to your blog at my own.

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